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Car tyre review

Find the best car tyres (member content) using our tyre comparsion, which looks at cornerning, stopping power and rolling resistance. We also have a car tyre buying guide so you know what to look for when you your vehicle needs new rubber.

Have a question about tyres? Ask us in the comments below.

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Good to see a wide range of tyres being tested, but my tyre size (215/75/16) missed out yet again. :slightly_frowning_face:

An obvious filter for sorting which is missing is for size/type of vehicle; eg small , medium, large, 4WD, sports, van, etc.

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Thanks for your feedback @meltam, I’ll pass it on to our reviewers :thumbsup:

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A post was split to a new topic: Motorcycle tyres

The latest 2018 car tyre review (member content) is now available.

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When might another review on tyres come out? Last one was about 2 years ago and I’m sure the market has changed.

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Hey @grahroll, we don’t have a tyre review update scheduled at the moment, but I’ve passed on your request.

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It would be good. I still hate the “Bluestreak” tyres on my suzuki ignis (2002 model) but the damn things refuse to wear out.

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On the age of tyres there are various views on the age at which a tyre should be replaced regardless of wear, mileage or usage. Hopefully some relevant and informative content can be provided including any differences between manufacturers recommendations.

Design and material differences may deliver different outcomes. Tyres recycled into trailer use often deliver a resounding failure due to their low use and extreme age.

It would be interesting to see some tests for common brands and tyres load rated for the 1tonne tradies 2WD utes. EG 215/65r16C 106/104T. The pricing between brands and outlets varies significantly.

Curiosity, the first set of Goodyears were made in GB. The next identical branded same model were made in Thailand. And Yokohama have chosen to leave the place of manufacture off the markings. Recommendations may not always be reliable over time if the source of manufacture also varies within the same brand and model.

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You need to do bigger burnouts.

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Fortunately we do know better.:wink:

https://www.9news.com.au/national/boy-injured-after-being-hit-by-wheel-of-ute-in-caboolture-queensland/fab11258-58ab-479b-a2f3-cbd19ef14249?ref=BP_RSS_ninenews_4_boy-critically-injured-after-being-hit-by-flying-wheel_261120

Unless @SueW has a restricted CAMS license and is looking forward to the next Suzuki track day.
Car advice has already done one outing.
Of course, the Suzuki Ignis is not a race car, but we wanted to know just how fast or slow it was. It stopped the clocks in the 0–100km/h dash in an average of 11.3 seconds , which is a similar pace to the latest Toyota Prius hybrid in case you’re wondering.

P.S.
Sips fuel and is apparently very easy to park.
Not as much fun or as small as the original Mini, it would need to shrink 0.5m in length and 0.3m in width to challenge Mr Bean’s skill level.

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I think that review is probably about the most recent iteration of the Ignis. They stopped making it at one stage and when it came back it was bigger and better. Mine looks a bit like an overgrown rollerskate, and is as slow as a wet week.

No CAMS licence here and no burnouts. I just want tyres which will be reliable in the rain. The Bluestreak are not. They are scary!

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Probably one of the harder compounds, while they provide great longevity they are less grippy in wet weather as you noted. You should find that a softer compound tyre will be better grip in the wet but less long lived.

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Ask mechanics as I have done several times over the years and on ne older guy said that unless you buy a new car where they fit genuine continental tyres the rest that are sold are not genuine. Even if you spend hundreds per tyre. And tyres need replacing every couple of years because they crack. He also told me that because less rubber is used and the manufacturer never tells any of us that plastic is used. That is why I don’t buy expensive tyres. Just cost to much. I recently had the tyres replaced as the inspection failed. Had no choice because they were cracking due to heat. Rubber would last longer than plastic that is used in tyres

165/70r14

It’s good to note that the Choice tyre reviews put stopping in the wet and wet cornering results at the top of the table for each tyre brand and model.

The tyre tread pattern also impacts on wet road performance. The Choice reviews may not test exactly the same tyre profile and size as those used on some older model vehicles.

Manufacturers usually carry the same tread patterns and other design details across a range of sizes for a particular tyre model. It’s worth looking at the brands and models of tyre that did well in the Choice tests for the same rim size and similar profiles to those of your own vehicle. It’s a guide that should assist in making an informed choice when discussing replacement tyres with the local supplier.

I was surprised at how well several slightly lower profile 175/65r14 tyres scored in the wet and dry, and for prices well below some big brand names, that did not do near as well. Noted at least one appears to be available in a more Suzuki friendly profile.

P.S.
I’m not suggesting anyone change the profile fitted from the manufacturers recommendations.

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Not exactly true they ‘never tell’. An unexpected place to provide a history of the basics, the impacts, and reveal much is National Geographic.

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Noting also changing tyre sizes in any way can affect the speedometer reading against actual road speed as the circumference of the tyre changes. Some changes are very minor and exist even between a cold and hot tyre, but too much change from fitting an alternative size can result in speed cameras bringing in revenue because your speed is no longer within tolerances, as displayed. A useful tool, and there are many on the net, shows the details and the speedo error introduced between differing sizes. Tyre shops can obviously advise.

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interesting read i never knew that we have been using plastic in tyres for so long. even in the late 1800 period the first tyre produced by goodyear chap. so it isnt really a new thing. i remember older style wheels before the beed on wheels was invented i just cant recollect what they called it.inside the tyre it was filled with air and sometimes would leak.

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A tube.

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That is what I was meaning. Tubed were used instead of beeds. I never knew how long back when plastic was used in tyres. Must of had technical ability.

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