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Sour dough bread, sour dough starter

Maybe a question that everyone else know the answer to but I cannot find information. What are the benefits of sour dough bread, why is it so popular and considered to be a healthy choice?

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An advertisement, although self serving, has its opinion

and you can take or leave the veracity of this article

We buy sour dough purely because of the taste and crust. I cannot speak for others.

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We eat it for the same reasons but only when we are eating pasta and such like to mop up the sauce.

We buy Coles Finest By Laurent White Sourdough Vienna which is the nicest that we have tasted.

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Nutritionally there isn’t much difference between Sourdough and other breads made from similar ingredients… If you like the flavour, texture, crust etc of a type of bread then enjoy it. There are really no right or wrong answers as can be seen from what follows as both articles have differing answers in parts but the whole outcome is enjoy in moderation regardless of what type you eat. Of course if you are a Celiac sufferer then avoiding gluten is imperative.

This article from Healthline has references to studies to support it’s statements. From the overall assessment in the article it supports that Sourdough has several health benefits for eaters of the product:

There is however an article about a study which says that the differences between eating Sourdough and other breads is not significant:


Link to the Study
https://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/fulltext/S1550-4131(17)30288-7

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Sounds like a plan.

The reasons given for greater health-giving all look rather tenuous to me, or at least unproven. They also make the error of jumping between saying it is higher in some factor that is thought to be beneficial and allowing people to conclude that therefore this bread is better for you; the two are not the same. Further, much of the blurb is about applying the ‘all natural’ gloss, which various people here have mentioned, quite a few times, is a fallacy.

I sometimes keep my dough (using normal yeast) for 24-36 hours before baking which definitely changes the flavor (more yeasty) and texture (more crunchy crust). Some people really like that result. It would share with sourdough the greater development of yeast metabolites although they would be somewhat different. Worth a try if you like that kind of thing and it can be done with normal bread machine ingredients.

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Thanks everyone.

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For sufferers of IBS or hypersensitive intestinal disorder, Monash Uni recommends sourdough on its FODMAP diet. All other wheat products are out of bounds. (Wheat, not gluten).
Genuine slow cultured sourdough that is, not commercial products, which often contain small quantities of yeast to speed up the process.

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I wonder how well this compares with general dietary advice for IBS? The source adds credibility and it should be a good option.

https://www.monashfodmap.com/

It is also supported by an App

The FODMAP diet is always recommended in the first instance by gastroenterologists, and while very challenging to follow, if often highly effective.
Some people are able to revert to an average diet after some months on it. Wheat can continue to be inflammatory though, so home made sourdough is a good solution.

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Wondering if anyone has made Sourdough with home made sourdough starter or purchased a starter.

Thought of falling deeper into DIY hole and making Sourdough.

have watched many online lessons and it takes a week to make it. It’s rather expensive to make as well.

Hi @annaa63, I moved your question to this older topic hoping it might revive interest in sour dough, as well as get some answers.

A friend of mine has made it with some success - I’ve tried twice and ended up with what could best be described as a science experiment gone wrong … I love sourdough bread though, just easier to buy it :slight_smile:

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Here’s a couple of links FYI. I read, then bookmarked them (& didn’t do anything…), but they may help.
Starter: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/mar/08/make-your-own-sourdough-bread-starter-recipe
Sourdough: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/apr/08/coronavirus-crisis-loaf-bread-sourdough-bake-off-flour-yeast-lockdown
And of course, there’s always your local library: a plethora of books on the subject!

Here’s one I bought: image

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Feel same as there so so many bakeries that bake amazing sourdough.

Going to try, but still planning on buying the starter. making it is just too expensive as I would use non bleached organic flour and it costs $7 per kg

thank you

have you made the starter and the bread? did they work out?

Sourdough starter has nothing to do with IBS nor fodmap

No to both questions - sorry…

Hi, I got some sour dough starter from a neighbour and have been making my own bread from scratch since March (honestly, not a lockdown fad!) It’s great, bread can be as simple as the grain products, white unbleached flour/whole meal/grain mix with the natural yeast from the starter which is simply water and flour doing its thing, a small quantity of salt, mixed with water and autolysed and proofed. No fancy additives just a little time. It takes a little bit of practice but the results are fantastic.

Not sure why, my local health food shop sells 3 kg of unbleached white flour for around $7. (I’m in the ACT) Once you have your starter, you can either keep it out on the bench and feed and water it every day, or put it in the fridge to slow down, take it out a day before you want to start making bread, feed and water it a couple of times and away you go. I’ve been using a two stage fermentation, making levain from the starter, then mixing flour and autolysing it, then adding the levain and finally the salt (12 g per 800 g bread dough). Then time to prove and shape before baking. Works really well.