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Best Anzac biscuits

Calling all biscuit fans - apart from baking your own, what do rate as the best tasting Anzac biscuit? You can vote in the poll below or leave a comment for a product that isn’t included.

  • Arnott’s Simple Batch Anzac Biscuits
  • Unibic Anzac Biscuits
  • Coles Anzac Biscuits
  • Coles Gluten Free Anzac Biscuits
  • Woolworths.Anzac Biscuits
  • Other (leave a comment)

0 voters

6 Likes

I don’t eat any of them.

4 Likes

fait à la maison

7 Likes

I would say my Mum’s but she’s been gone (along with the recipe) for almost 30 years. Coles Anzacs are very close. A bit too sweet perhaps, but the texture is much the same as Mum’s.

8 Likes

As with Sue, my mum used to make the best ones. I don’t think I’ve ever eaten commercially made ones.

I actually like the dough better than the baked biscuit and must admit to once making up a batch and not bothering to turn the oven on, as the intention was to eat the dough :slight_smile:

10 Likes

I’ve always thought to really be an ANZAC biscuit they had to be home made. That is the tradition. Anything store bought is just an imitation.

I’m pretty sure there was always a race for my grandmothers. Made with love, and like others of her generation with special memories for two of her brothers. One survivor, one not returned.

9 Likes

The ones I make. Everyone else’s (manufacturers) are too dry.

5 Likes

Totally agree!

6 Likes

Unibic…
Only if I can’t be bothered making them. I use the good old CWA book recipe :slight_smile:

4 Likes

I find several varieties (commercial, bakery & home cooked) a bit too sweet.

I use Amy Schauer’s recipe. She was born 1871 and instructed in cookery through World War I. The book I have from my Grandmother who nursed through WWI was probably her later 1937 edition (it’s undated) which amalgamated all her previous books. The fact that these are called ANZAC means it was not her 1909 edition. During the war, eggs and butter were hard to get. Recipe as written with old spelling; it’s before standardised measures:-

ANZAC Biscuits
Sift 1 cup of plain flour into a mixing bowl, add 1 1/2 cups of rolled oats, 1 small cup of cocoanut, 1 small cup of sugar, 2 teaspoons ground ginger, and 1/4 lb of melted butter or rub in small 1/2 cup dripping. Put into a basin 1 level tablespoon of golden syrup, add 2 full tablespoons boiling water, or 1 beaten egg and 1 tablespoon of boiling water, and 1 level teaspoon of crushed bi-carb soda. Mix this over dry ingredients in mixing bowl, and directly it foams pour into mixture, blend thoroughly together. Take teaspoon quantities, flatten, place on well-greased tins, prick with a fork, leaving a space between each, as they spread. Bake in a very slow oven, as they burn easily.

6 Likes

I am like some of the above, I prefer and now only eat homemade ones…we cook ourselves. We can chose if we want them chewy or crunchy…or less sweet.

I find the bought ones don’t have the same depth of flavour as those made at home,

The fresher the better.

4 Likes

… the only biscuits I buy are TimTams … everything else (including biscuits) is best made at home …

5 Likes

I once tried Dick Smith’s Anzacs. They were disgusting, much like his vegemite analog.

2 Likes

Homemade or bakery. Others have shrunk.

2 Likes

I have tried a lot of bought Anzac biscuits and none of them are as good as home made ones - no matter how bad they are

4 Likes

MUMs own.

1 Like

I must admit I miss my late gandmothers Anzacs, they were what I would describe the perfect biscuit…thinnish, beautiful flavour and crunchy when baked, chewy after a few days of storage…yum.

4 Likes

Agree with other people, store bought are too dry and hard.

When I was serving in the Aust Army, my wife used to send me her own anzac recipe that replaced the oatmeal with the same quantity of fruit muesli (with a few more sultanas and currants thrown in). When she sent them to places that had hotter and drier climates she put less golden syrup to make them less chewey.

If there wasn’t enough golden syrup they become too hard and break to pieces in transit over rough roads in the back of an army transporter.

3 Likes