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RIP Internet Explorer

An article advising that Internet Explorer is to be scrapped.

I thought that it had been scrapped years ago when Edge became the built-in browser in Windows, and which I find still does not hold a candle to Chrome.

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IE development for new features did end back in 2016, to be replaced by Edge.
Mind you, I don’t use Edge either because it is just more of the same.
Chrome and Firefox on Windows have just left the MS browsers way behind.

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Edge is now Chromium, quite agile as a Browser & getting far better.

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Why use a Chrome wannabe when you can use the real thing?
And I wonder how long it will be before MS figures out some legal way of having Edge be the only browser that really works with all the features of Office 365.

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One of the features of Internet Explorer that I liked, was its ability to create desktop shortcuts to individual websites complete with icons, which were easily identifiable, as the icons were the logo of the company’s website, and for example, in the case of a shortcut to Westpac Bank login - they had the Westpac logo as the icon for quick reference.
It is my understanding that neither MS Edge for Win10, or Firefox, which I use, do not have this ability to create dedicated company logos, as an icon incorporated in the desktop shortcut.

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Why use it or other Chromium? Because they don’t phone Google Home, while they might phone other homes I have to say the Google one might be the bigger house of horrors.

From Wikipedia some info

" Chromium lacks the following Chrome features:[9]

"In addition to Google Chrome, many other notable web browsers have been based on the Chromium code.

Active

  • Amazon Silk
  • Avast Secure Browser developed by Avast
  • Beaker, a peer-to-peer web browser
  • Blisk is a browser available for Windows 7 and later, OS X 10.9 and later that aims to provide an array of useful tools for Web development.
  • Brave is an open-source web browser that aims to block website trackers and remove intrusive internet advertisements.
  • CodeWeavers CrossOver Chromium is an unofficial bundle of a Wine derivative and Chromium Developer Build 21 for Linux and macOS, first released on 15 September 2008 by CodeWeavers as part of their CrossOver project.[65][66]
  • Comodo Dragon is a rebranded version of Chromium for 32-bit Windows 8.1, 8, Windows 7 and Vista[67] produced by the Comodo Group. According to the developer, it provides improved security and privacy features.[68]
  • Cốc Cốc is a freeware web browser focused on the Vietnamese market, developed by Vietnamese company Cốc Cốc, based on Chromium open-source code for Windows.[69] According to data published by StatCounter in July 2013, Cốc Cốc has passed Opera to become one of the top 5 most popular browsers in Vietnam[70] within 2 months after its official release.[71]
  • Epic Browser is a privacy-centric web browser developed by Hidden Reflex of India and based on Chromium source code.[72]
  • Falkon a Qt-based GUI, using the Chromium-based QtWebEngine.[73]
  • qutebrowser a Qt-based GUI with Vim-like keybindings, using the Chromium-based QtWebEngine.[74]
  • Microsoft Edge is Chromium-based as of 15 January 2020.[75][76]
  • Naver Whale is a South Korean freeware web browser developed by Naver Corporation, which is also available in English. It became available on Android on 13 April 2018.
  • Opera began to base its web browser on Chromium with version 15.[77]
  • Qihoo 360 Secure Browser is a Chromium-based Chinese web browser developed by Qihoo.[78]
  • SalamWeb is a web browser based on Chromium for Muslims, which only allows Halal websites/information.
  • Samsung Internet shipped its first Chromium-based browser in a Galaxy S4 model released in 2013.[79]
  • Sleipnir is a Chromium derivative browser for Windows and macOS. One of its main features is linking to Web apps (Facebook, Twitter, Dropbox, etc.) and smartphone apps (Google Map, etc.). It also boasts what it calls “beautiful text,” and has unique graphical tabs, among other features.[80]
  • Slimjet: A Chromium-based web browser released by FlashPeak that features built-in webpage translation, PDF viewing capability and a PPAPI flash plugin, features usually missing from Chromium-based browsers currently not supported.
  • SRWare Iron is a freeware release of Chromium for Windows, macOS and Linux, offering both installable and portable versions. Iron disables certain configurable Chromium features that could share information with third parties and additional tracking features that Google adds to its Chrome browser.[81]
  • Torch is a browser based on Chromium for Windows. It specializes in media downloading and has built-in media features, including a torrent engine, video grabber and sharing button.[82]
  • Vivaldi is a browser for Windows, macOS and Linux developed by Vivaldi Technologies.[83][84] Chromium-based Vivaldi aims to revive the rich features of the Presto-era Opera with its own proprietary modifications.
  • Yandex Browser is a browser created by the Russian software company Yandex for macOS, Windows and Linux.[85] The browser integrates Yandex services, which include a search engine, a machine translation service and cloud storage."
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from Firefox

from Edge

Your problem is?

edit: If you are not seeing the icons, try deleting the bookmarks and adding them again.

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Both Firefox and Chrome do it automatically. If I create a link to a site, or it appears in my frequent sites page, the company logo is presented.
Both on Win10 and Android.

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If you want to chase the rabbits down their burrows over original sources of open source public domain software, then you will find that almost everything borrows from other things.
The important part is what is built using those bases. Chrome, the browser, gets its roots from Chromium (same company, Google), and Mozilla, and yes, Apple.
At least Chrome and Firefox (Mozilla) stuck to WWW standards, where MS with IE did not.

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My response was to your

Why use a Chronium variant over Chrome? Open source as Chrome isn’t even though it is derived from an open source product, most don’t contact Google, many are more secure out of the box than Chrome.

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That feature of Chrome that you dislike, phoning home to big brother Google, is what I find a great feature. My browsers are all synced. Phone, tablet, Win10, Ubuntu.

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Only the standalone browser interface. It will still be part of the operating system and the underlying engine. The reason for it remaining as part of the operating system is because it is used by quite a few line-of-business applications. Until all the business applications are recoded to remove IE, it will remain part of Windows.

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…is because that was how Microsoft defended its allegedly monopolistic behaviour in the US courts.

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… why use a Debian wannabe when you could use the real thing? :wink:

Had to pick one. Free. Supported. Ticks the right boxes for me both of them, but Ubuntu just has a sexier name.

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