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Is a Dyson fan worth the money?

Will you really be blown away by how great your Dyson fan is, or is it just a cool waste of money?

If you have a Dyson fan, please share your experience below.

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If you want to keep your cool a fan is a fan for many and what constitutes good seems personal. I like the [member content] that comes out fairly ordinary in tests. Some prize quiet, some air speed, some unobtrusive air motion, and some the decorator aspects. Many fans don’t fit well in smaller rooms, hence the popularity of towers.

As for the Dyson, we don’t and wouldn’t own one, but we had one in a beaut B&B where we stayed 5 days last year. It was absolutely a novelty. It was a nice quiet fan that moved air in a relatively unobtrusive quiet manner but nothing special unless there were small hands that like to challenge blades (of which there are none, of either).

Whether making a statement with a Dyson is a waste of money is for the family treasurer to decide :wink:

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I also question the claim that the fans are bladeless. The fan does contain blades (which Dyson calls fins) on a ‘small internal turbine’ to generate airflow.

This video shows how the fan works…

I suppose on the other hand one can’t see blades like a traditional fan (“they don’t have fast-spinning blades that could hurt little hands”), but it doesn’t mean that it isn’t bladeless.

And I wonder if this is correct…

"they’re easier to clean than basic pedestal fans as they don’t have grills or blades that gather dust "

As the internal blades/fins don’t look like they can be readily cleaned and would be a dust collection point, as well as the air intake area.

I wonder if some of the content is from Dyson marketing material or independently established by Choice?

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Agree!
Whatever Dyson calls them, they are traditionally called blades on any similar engineering component.

Dyson might say ‘concealed blade design’ more honestly.

It’s a fine line between marketing hype and an obvious lie. That the fan is externally without blades might pass muster. Calling the extensions on the internal rotor fins might challenge the wisdom of Rolls Royce, Siemens and others.

Dyson have one innovation with the Venturi design of the fan.

The little rotor is just an exercise in refining existing design principles, albeit similar shaped open rotors have been used in pumps for eons, and more elaborate dual scrolls also found in air compressors.

I think we are splitting hairs over a trendy designer product. Perhaps a design were trend matters more than lifetime cost or efficiency of performance.

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There will always be people who will pay through the nose for mimimalistic design - B&O audio comes to mind.

If you dispassionately look at value for money, Dyson products fail miserably in comparison to other products which achieve the same or better outcomes for far less cost.

So for your average pleb who can’t afford to lavishly lash out the lucre, Dyson isn’t worth the $$$.

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I have a small dyson filter fan because I have allergies and live in an area with poor air quality. Anecdotally I’ve found leaving it running removes some of the smog smell compared to the rest of the house during bad periods. So although I can’t definitively say it’s helped, it may be worth a try if you have allergies and need a new fan/heater anyway.

There is an ability to connect it to your wifi to monitor what it’s actually filtering, but I’ve currently not got it set up

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I have a friend like this. He can afford it so he has his B&O, and his Dyson vc cleaner and fan. Beats me, I love my DC fans from Bunnings. Even if I could afford, I would not bother with Dyson.

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I don’t have a Dyson but I have encountered them at friends’ places. My observation is that they are quiet but then again so is a cheapo pedestal fan set on low. For the amount of air the Dyson moves it would want to be quiet.

As for saving little fingers I doubt that this is a huge issue. A cheap pedestal fan has plastic blades and a rotor that is not very heavy it is unlikely to break the skin although it will hurt. And how does that tot get up to it? If the enterprising toddler must climb, get through the guard and touch I can think of worse ways (electric stove) for them to learn that when mummy says don’t touch there is a reason for it. The idea that we must make the environment totally risk free is bunk.

Your valuation of style over effect would have to give you a very good feeling indeed to pay 10-20 times as much. For the price you could get a ceiling fan (or two) installed that would do all this and more and probably do it better. These are Veblen goods.

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Thank you. I hadn’t heard of him before that I can recall. He had interesting theories.

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