CHOICE membership

Amperage of fridge


#1

Preamble: I have recently purchased a 450L LG bottom mounted refrigerator (Model GB-450UWLX), which has a 4.5 star rating (apparently the highest rating currently available); it is using 2/3 less power than the fridge it replaced (a Westinghouse RS 662VT), with which I am very happy!
A family member lives off grid & is very interested in the low energy consumption (299 kWh pa), after many, many years of gas &12V refrigeration…
He asked me for the amperage of the fridge, but after checking the Tech Specs, Owners Manual & the Choice test results - nada! I am hoping that one/some of the Community membership can help with a ballpark figure??


#2

If off grid there are three items to consider.

The daily total power consumption.
The maximum continuous rated current.
The peak startup or surge current of the fridge compressor.

Listed in the fridge manual and definitely on the name plate of the fridge will be the rated current as well as the nominal power in watts. It is not a direct relationship due to a difference in the phase relationship (power factor) between voltage and current. It is best to find the manufacturers rating if it is important.

I did the exercise for our Electrolux Fridge and checked it using an inline power meter.

The rated current on the nameplate was close enough.

The daily power consumption (annual on the star rating label divided by 365) was a poor estimate. Our fridge was star rated to use less than 1.2kWh per day. Over several weeks it used an average of 1.6kWh or more. At least 33% greater than specification. Even when we were away for a few days the power used was about the same.

The peak startup current was harder to determine. In the absence of any other information it may be around 6 times the rated load current. Only important to know if the offgrid power supply has a low cost low power inverter. Not so critical if it is a full fat professional system capable of 3-5kW.

There may also be a nameplate on the compressor of the fridge. If you can access and find it you should find a value for a LRA (locked rotor amps). This is the best guide to the maximum surge or starting current. This spike will hit the home grid every time the compressor comes oncycle. Often several times each hour.

There should be the answer to the rated current on the fridge model label usually somewhere inside the front door area of the fridge. Also the model number, serial number and fridge volume. There is typically also an electrical compliance plate on the rear typically near the compressor and power cord entry?


#3

I’ve run fridges off-grid since 1991, and have found that the most important determinant of how much energy it uses is the ambient air temperature, for a given fridge.
Even the 25yo (or maybe more) fridge we have uses on average over the year a bit over 1kWh per day. More in summer, and less in winter.
Starting current varies significantly, depending on compressor load at the time of starting, but can be up to 10X the rated power use. IE a 150W fridge compressor can draw up to 1.5kW for a few seconds on starting, but often is is only marginally more than the rated power.
I log my off-grid system with 1sec sampling on a data logger, so have gained a pretty good understanding of power use by various devices. My “2HP” aquaponics water chiller can use up to about 14kW (~260A draw on battery and PV panels) on starting sometimes!
“The amperage” isn’t a number that is really relevant, the most important will be the rated power (and estimated max power) and daily energy use, depending a bit on the off-grid system details.

Unfortunately, LG doesn’t give any detailed specs on the fridge model above, so you’d have to check the specifications plate, probably on the compressor- which may or may not be easily accessible.

You could put a energy monitor on the fridge and leave it for a week- that should at least show energy use, power consumption when running, and maximum power draw.


#4

I suggest contacting Westinghouse who might provide a definitive answer, or not, but worth a try.