CHOICE membership

Some(?) goods no longer "made in china"

Don’t know if this has been raised elswhere - couldn’t find a reference to it, but apologies if already mentioned.
I was in Woolworths today (1 Jul) and was looking at some hand sanitiser bottles… On checking where the product was made (as I like to try to buy Australian made) I found the product had “Made in PRC”.

Had to think on that - of course this is the Peoples Republic of China.

Not certain how many people would identify the change. The labelling has apparently being changed to remove the direct reference to China. Raises all sorts of interesting reasons why.

altc

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In reality, PRC (People’s Republic of China) is the official name of ‘China’. China is an abbreviation used commonly in replacement for PRC.

PRC is the abbreviation. Like Made in NZ is for those made in New Zealand.

If one wishes to to officially correct, then packaging should have PRC or People’s Republic of China.

Otherwise we could accept things like ‘Made in Aus’, Made in America’ etc

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Agree with what you have said about the official name of China. My point was that by using the abbreviation, I doubt that it would be clear to many people that this was actually the abbreviation of People’s Republic of China and therefore not think that it was a chinese product (especially as most products have previously been labelled with ‘made in china’).
altc

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Perhaps, but should it matter?

We talk about Made In - ???
Is it

  1. GB, Great Britain, the UK, or Engkand
  2. the USA, America, or the United States
  3. NZ or New Zealand
  4. Australia, the CoA, or CA

China the land mass or China the People’s Republic of China. The latter is perfectly well defined.

One commentator with a more conservative view point recently stated a preference for using the PRC in short or full. Firstly to distinguish that nation of origin from the Republic of Taiwan, which the PRC claim is also part of China. A second less subtle message might be the PRC politically is a single party socialist republic. One Australia has been quite happy to trade and do business with for many decades.

Perhaps it is simply a matter of what we are used to? ‘Made in the PRC’ might come to be more commonly used.

We accept ‘Made in the USA’ the political union quite happily. ‘Made in the PRC’ is from the same mould.

Yes it’s possibly subtle subterfuge to avoid saying “CHINA!”. To me the PRC means the same thing, only more pointed at the political reality when you say it out loud in full.

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