September 2022 Food Challenge - Kitchen Wipes/Cloths - what do you use?

I use Koh spray and cloths, which I change out every other day (we are only two adults in the household), or earlier if very soiled. Around the sink I’ll do a wipe down with a surfaces-only sponge to get rid of water and gunk before spraying down and hitting the stainless steel with the Koh diamond sponge. We moved into our first place last year and the 33 year old sink comes up shiny and new thanks to the diamond sponge, way better than the old ajax.

3 Likes

I use Gumption on my sink. I think it is the detergent in it as it also works a treat on banana sap on knives - those who grow bananas and get the sap on clothes and implements from the fronds and stems will know how hard it is to remove. It oxidises, turns brown and stains.

I reduced the use of cloths, towels etc by processing things on the sink, a quick wipe of the hand or flush of water and its gone to the grease trap (which I clean regularly). Liquids go straight through to the septic. Only wish I had a double drainer sink, they are rare in the age of dishwashers.

5 Likes

If you really want to save the environment they could be knitted from your own wool.

1 Like

For the past few years, I’ve been using hand-made (knitted/crocheted) cotton cloths for cleaning everything except fats/oils.
The cloths last more than a year, and I have a few to cycle through. They wash and dry easily. I baulk at the amount of micro-plastics shed from fabrics and I like this alternative.
They can also look nice.

I make sets for friends as gifts, and they are very popular.
The only downside is the time spent making them, but it’s a hobby I can do in any free time, or multi-tasking e.g. while watching TV, chatting with friends, or being a car passenger.

NB. For fats and oils, after getting off as much as possible with a spatula, if there’s too much left to clean with a cloth then I’ll use a paper towel and compost it.

7 Likes

Wool isn’t good as a cleaning material. It’s fluffy, stretches, and felts easily. It’s also not all that durable.

Cotton, linen and hemp are better.
Recycled cotton t-shirts work too–cut the body into a thin spiral (say 8-10mm wide) and use as a yarn.
And of course old cotton knits can be frogged to use the yarn.

For new yarn, a 50g ball of 10 ply will make about 2 cloths, depending on size. I like 18-20cm squares.

7 Likes

Hi @Jen, would you have a photo to share of one as I am sure many members would be interested in seeing what they look like for inspiration.

3 Likes

Some examples

8 Likes

We use hand-knitted pure cotton cloths that I made, and dry surfaces with tea towels. We replace them each day, or more often if we use them for a messy cleaning job. We also sometimes use paper (bamboo) towel roll. As well we have lots of serviettes, that we use and wash each day.

5 Likes

But if you use your own no sheep will be harmed.

3 Likes

True, although most of us don’t have much of a wool covering.

3 Likes

I use Vileda cloths. I use them in the kitchen and bathroom they are washed each week and replaced with a clean one. I change them every 2 to 3 days, Long lasting and absorb easily, and are good for the environment as they are not disposable.

4 Likes

I think Maggie1 was being facetious.

1 Like

I use them too - and once they are getting past it, I put them in the worm farm. I wash them and dry outside, and they do last a long time.

3 Likes

One type is the huck towel, a cotton cloth, blue in colour, commonly used in surgeries. I have bought some of these to replace microfibre cloths.

5 Likes

I am so glad this is being discussed! If I’d been asked this last week, I’d’ve shrugged, indifferent.
But that was before a new kitchen sponge left so much colour dye that a saucepan of clean water went almost opaque. That was before a hastily bought alternative then leached almost as much colour dye again. That was before a third brand of sponge, damp with simply water, caused my hands to peel.
Experiences like these start to get one thinking, y’know? Questions like, if this has happened to me, how many others? Questions like, what is in that colour dye?
Sponges, & colour dyes, and human health?
So, yes, this is a subject that has immediate currency for me! And, although this is only one person’s story, maybe it’s time to get those questions answered. Thanks.

5 Likes

Yes, I like these too. I bought a bulk pack online and shared them with friends.
I use them for general cleaning, as tea-towels, and many other uses.
A great way of re-using a product that would otherwise go to landfill :face_with_raised_eyebrow:

1 Like

Me neither. I was always taught “skein”.

3 Likes

Did you ask the makers what is in their sponges?

Welcome @P.J!
Yes, this Challenge is subtly thought-provoking. While we look at what kitchen wipes/cloths we’re using, we can also consider what is the impact of the product on our fragile environment.

4 Likes