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Mobility/electric scooters

I just want a cheap electric scooter which I can sit on and fold up at the bus. Not allowed in NSW. So I drive, and my car stays on the road for several years longer than it would, otherwise.

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I have lived and worked in several great locations in NSW. It might be a difficult decision? You could consider moving to QLD?

Although the current weather patterns suggest Qld is already moving south into NSW?

While not perfect you can purchase a folding low frame E-Bike.
No rego.
You can ride it on the footpath and road.
And if you feel the need pedal a little to boost the power and get some gentle exercise at the same time.

I hired a full frame off road E-bike and comfortably managed the hills and traffic around Noosa for a short break. On the level there is more speed than you might like. Not even a mild sweat on a balmy summer day! It’s the speed that helps keep you cool! :biking_woman:t2:

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Sadly I am past all that now. My next car will be a mobility scooter. I was just trying for something in between.

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It’s always good to be able to think ahead. Technology in this sector is moving relatively quickly. It’s likely there will be more and better options in the not so distant future?

Assume you are aware of these?

https://www.scootersaus.com.au/scooters/portable-mobility-scooters

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Scooters, particularly the 49cc ‘no motorcycle licence required’ type are a death trap. How these things are even considered legal and usable is a complete aberration of logic and reason … my view only … seen plenty of scars to support it (not mine, 1200cc is the minimum in my ‘scooter stable’) :wink:

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Yes, and many more. There are some brilliant scooters about, now, nearly as good as a car were it not for speed restrictions. The Drive King Cobra is my current favourite but at close to $7k well beyond my means. However, to go distance and get onto buses and trains, I was hoping to be able to get something thats both portable and lightweight and which can take my own great weight. The current set of portable mobility scooters are too heavy for me to lift onto a bus, but a stand/sit scooter would be fine. I’d be looking for something to get me from home to the bus stop (500m doesnt seem like much, but when you cant really walk more than 50…) and then the short hops from a to b at other times. As I become less and less able, I’m going to be stuck in my local area, but until then, I want to find suitable alternatives, sadly they do not seem to exist.

[Edit] I was just thinking, I would also need it to be 3-4 wheels for stability and then we are getting into too big territory. Guess I’ll just keep driving until I need the proper scooter. I may get a portable to put in the car for those times I can’t get parking close to where I need to be, but so far, with the disability parking card, it hasnt been a huge issue.

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I wouldnt touch a petrol powered one with a ten foot bargepole.

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I don’t even own a barge pole :wink: but it’s not the source of propulsion that is likely to lead to injury or worse for the pilot, its the geometry and wheel size - arguably unsafe at any speed …

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@PhilT Thanks for the topic split. It probably does warrant separate discussion.

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I’d have to agree with that, I would not even feel safe on one which was only foot propelled. Thats why I had been looking at some which have 8-10" wheels.

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And in some cases I’ve witnessed, it’s the Kamikaze driver.

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I live in a large regional city where public transport (buses only) is not as good as the big cities and operates mon to Frid, last bus about 6pm, and Sat morning. My old car was 20 years old and beyond driving out of town so only used it locally. When latest problem was going to cost nearly $1,000 I decided to sell it and invest in second hand scooter. I am lucky because I do live in the CBD and have footpaths to ride on. I love it. I still have my independance and freedom and while out and about see so much more that I missed when driving. Mine has a good range of about 25km so can get to places I need and the 8kph max speed is fast enough. There are times when I catch the bus to places farther afield but mostly I ride my scooter up the door of the shop, park and walk in.

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Which do you have? I’m struggling with making a decision (plus having to allocate funds to other things, like replacing my HWS!! ARGHH)

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Mine is a Shoprider, the same as this, but older model. I bought mine second hand on Gumtree.

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Thanks for that, I had looked at that model but dismissed it for a reason I cant even remember now!. I’ll check gumtree and facebook market. I’m within scooting distance of Coles, Aldi, my GP, hairdresser and pharmacy. If I needed to go further afield, maybe a cab or uber, and I have some friends nearby who are always telling me they will take me, but I hate imposing so I dont ask… maybe time to put the pride away. My car is now 17 years old, but still in good nick, and it hasnt really cost me much in repairs, so I’ll hang in for a bit longer, and continue my scooting research :slight_smile:

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Regarding mobility scooter battery charging: my mother-in-law has had 3 failed batteries in 14months in a new scooter. The first two replacements were under warrant but last week the latest failure was not as the battery was not covered by the 12month scooter purchase warranty. My main concern is that it was explained to us that it seems the failures were our fault because of the mainly short-trip & top-up method of charging. This apparently ‘teaches’ the battery to charge only to an increasingly lower capacity until it won’t charge at all. They should be allowed to almost fully discharge before re-charging (the supplier says they have only recently learned this from two battery suppliers). Now a $250 battery purchase needed. Anyone else know about this or had problems?

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Short charge/discharge cycles were a problem with NiCad (Nickel Cadmium) battreies as used in the early analogue mobile phones but I would not have thought that they would be used in a mobility scooter in this day and age.

I would expect that they would use either sealed lead acid batteries as used in lawn mowers or Lithium Ion batteries as used in electric vehicles.

Check your product manual or Google the make and model to find out the type of battery.

Lead acid or Lithium Ion batteries should not fail in a matter of months due to short charge and discharge cycles.

I recently changed the sealed lead acid battery in our electric start Rover lawn mower after more than 4 years.

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I thought most scooters had Lithium batteries. Eitehr way, the tech has improved to the point where they should not be wearing out that fast… I wonder which brand?

Is it worth complaining to the ACCC?

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It might be worth asking just how long the sales person who sold the scooter has been in the business?

‘only recently learned’ It is hardly credible, whether it is the scooter sales person or the two battery sales persons!

Perhaps there is a fault with the scooter or charging circuit?

Perhaps the batteries are cheap duds.

Is the $250 replacement battery from the same source as the scooter?

For what it is worth, if possible you might source a replacement battery from someone else that is independent. If you can access a scooter repairer that is independent that might also be necessary. Perhaps you have a battery specialist nearby that could also offer some feedback on charging for the type of battery you have. Although if you can share the details here there is likely someone in the community who can offer some more advice.

What does the scooter manual say about battery charging? Does it say to run the battery down before charging? Does it say not to top up recharge on a routine basis?

Part of the answer might be in the user manual. If you are not doing anything wrong, it may be useful to know when considering what to do next?

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Thanks Mark-- all replies here confirm what I thought was common sense, that (like a car battery, lead-acid as the scooter ones are) the car battery is being charged every time the motor is on. To be told that just the opposite is true, that short trips (3-5km daily with almost daily ‘top-ups’) damage the batteries i.e.‘train’ them to charge to ever-decreasing capacity seems nonsense to me. This is also confirmed by talking to 3 battery suppliers here in Tassie (scooter bought from Lifestyle Mobility, S.A.) : Norco, Devonport, Island Batteries,Launceston & Supercheap Auto, Burnie. I haven’t come across any other scooter owner with the same problem. PB.

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