Hygienic washing of Bath and kitchen towels

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One immunologist debunking the myth is like conspiracy theorists and ant-vaxxers quoting one doctor.
Link like that does not pass the pub test as qualified research.

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I chose one from many websites.
Please share with us the evidence that you know of? Thanks :slightly_smiling_face:

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A few drops of tea tree oil in the wash. Gets rid of sweat smells too.

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Years ago I accidentally “killed” our AWTS with napisan, it had been in the bucket for days . The bloke who services it advises that it is a definite no-no at any time. Please provide some evidence that it is safe after 8 hours.

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Look up the life of sodium percarbonate.
Sadly you were fold a furphy.
You couldn’t put enough sodium percarbonate in a bucket to kill a septic. The highest sodium percarbonate concentration you can buy in the supermarket is/was 346gm/kg. Now around 257gm/kg.
Actually states on the products it is septic safe.
It is actually pretty damn hard to kill a septic system. They are far more resisliant than most realise. Look at all the septic systems that have town treated chlorinated water in large quantities put into septic systems without issue.

Not in our experience, but we are well off topic.

Several alternate topics that relate to different aspects of on-site treatment options.

Septic, Waste Water - New Standard Failure?

Zero Waste Living - #14 by natural.thought

https://www.choice.com.au/home-and-living/laundry-and-cleaning/laundry-detergents/articles/the-eco-cleaning-products-you-should-and-shouldnt-buy

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Thanks for the additional information. I think I am beginning to see the light. Until a few years ago many sanitisers and bleaches were based on chlorine which is deadly for microbes. Some, but not all, changed to other oxidising agents including napisan. So napisan (and some others) are no longer the end of your AWTS or septic.

That isn’t true generally and in my experience. It is true that napisan no longer will do it but it is fair for installers and maintainers to tell you not to use such products as otherwise they have to go into which ones are safe and which ones are not and as we have seen formulations change. There are plenty of chlorine bleaches and sanitisers still on the market that will kill your plant stone dead.

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I use a small amount of quat. in the rinse aid compartment which acts to soften the towels and maybe kill germs.

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I stayed in a cabin at a local place not long ago - the pipes to the cabins were about 50mm ag-style plastic mostly exposed to the sun. In the evening we had to wait over an hour before we could get into the bath, run entirely with ‘cold’ water - I’m sure one could have boiled an egg in the bath. Such is the nature of the outback sun on a 45c day :rofl:

Even the house water here, on a normal summer day, is far from ‘cold’ …

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" Time to abandon the hygiene hypothesis: new perspectives on allergic disease, the human microbiome, infectious disease prevention and the role of targeted hygiene"

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When I was growing up towels and sheets went into the copper to be boiled. What an ordeal for mothers. In the name of sustainability, I wash towels and sheets etc and clothes in my energy efficient front loader, at between 20 and 40 degrees, no hotter, using a Choice recommended powder or liquid. I live on the coast - the wind and the sun does the rest. I love to see those clothes fluttering.
In trying to kill all germs on all surfaces we create disease.

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Every bit of liquid or powder you add to the wash goes down the drain -adding further to environmental problems - eg the bleaching of coral, fish kill. Keep it simple. Buy as little from that laundry aisle as possible - It is all chemicals. Go back a few steps - The production of them contaminates water, produces emissions. The storage, delivery to wholesale ware houses, delivery to supermarkets is all emissions producing. Trust water, the safest liquid or powder, and where possible, the sun and the wind. Use the KISS system - Keep it simple, stupid. A few germs, or more climate ‘events’?

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If I may just indicate the accepted meaning of some of the definitions being used so far in this topic:

  • hygienic: sanitary, maintaining health, preventing disease, especially by being clean.
  • Sanitise: make hygienic.
  • Sterilise: make free from all viable micro-organisms. This is what a hospital operating room aims to achieve, it needs a controlled environment outside the means of what we can do in our living environment.

I think the best we can do in our homes is to keep to good hygiene practices, paying special attention to the food preparation area and cloths/towels used on perishable items in particular.

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I remember my grandmother ironing bed linen and towels saying that it helped to sanitise them. Of course in those times cotton, linen, terry towel, were the majority of the fabrics and could be ironed at the ‘hot’ setting on the iron. Nowadays fabrics are easy care, need little or no ironing, and even if the label says 100% cotton we can be sure the thread used for the stitching is from a synthetic source, as @mark_m points out in his reply above, and would not take well to hot ironing, or to hot water washing either :laughing:

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The discussion so far has focused on temperature and chemical treatment (bleach, vinegar) of the wash. What is overlooked is that you can run a cycle of the washing machine periodically at its highest temperature, aided by vinegar for example, without a load in the drum. The same principle is recommended for dishwashers.

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Interesting. I used Napisan and nappy buckets for 3 kids on a septic tank. I had no idea you couldn’t. All grown up now but never had problems with the septic system that I can remember.

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Absolutely you can use Napisan in septic tanks.
States so on the labels.

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Not being argumentative but flushable wipes state on their labels that they are fine in ‘well maintained sewer systems’ yet

I acknowledge napisan in septics is unrelated to ‘flushed flushable wipes’ but what is claimed on the label might be true or might be puffery or might be suspect, case and product dependent.

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It is 100% true and safe for use in septic tanks. This has been acknowledged by an independent expert…