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Hemp in food. Healthy, or just hip?

Hemp in food - would you try it?

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No different to any other seed. Hemp (drug) is often confused with hemp (textile/seed) but while they are the same species, their cell biochemistry is very different.

Eating hemp seeds is a little like eating poppy seeds, One wouldn’t bat an eyelid at eating poppy seeds on the bagel or bread roll (or in a multigrain bread), and hemp seed should not be any different.

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We use it mixed with a couple of other flours in our Bread mix. Nice taste addition as well as the suggested health benefits. Quite a dark flour sort of a greyish brownish colour, we use a fairly grainy grind others use a finer grind than we do. I have used it in cakes (more finely ground) but they tend to be darker cakes so no loss of visual appeal as would occur in sponges and similar.

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Poppy seeds on bread rolls still show up as opiates in random drug tests - at least they did many years ago at my husband’s workplace - and I doubt that the extreme sensitivity of these tests has improved since then! Blood testing proved negative…

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There are many hits on the net confirming your suspicion. When incompetents are in charge, imagine

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Reading the article, there were some frightening outcomes… and it’s pretty hard to prepare for randomdrug tests. After our experience, only sesame seeds were on the rolls!

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Hemp seeds used for food, as Choice outlined, can have no or low aTHC levels. The levels, like poppies, are unlikely to have any consequences with exception of highly sensitive drug testing and one consumes the seeds by the kilos.

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Apparently the roadside drug testing for cannabis is very sensitive. Here is the latest in a long series of examples of stories about people with very small amounts of THC in their blood (below any incapacity) being convicted. I wonder how the sums work out re hemp seed? Could one test positive?

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That magistrate, who I admire, was commenting on the laws not so much the tests, per se.

if they record a positive test, regardless of when and why they used the drug, and whether or not their driving was affected.

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Quite so. It is but one reference to the very sensitive nature of the test. My question remains.

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I have used hemp meal in cakes and bread in the past, maybe 5 years ago. It was a bit gritty, but tasted ok. Blurb on the packet enthusiastically promoted all the goodness contained within. The packet was labelled ‘not for human consumption’, as no approvals had been given at that stage.

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Rather than focus on the credentials of hemp as a ‘superfood’ - an idea that is only useful to marketeers in my view - how about looking at it as a new widespread crop for a world running out of arable land and water. We are going to have to make some decisions about which crops we can afford to have.

If it can provide fibre (with many uses) as well as food and if it can replace fibres requiring oil as a starting point, for example, maybe it is a useful crop. Food use includes stock as well as humans. I don’t include caged small birds in stock. Tweetie has too many small bones and feathers.

Criteria such as how it tastes in a smoothie seem a bit narrow to me.

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I understand the government has previously made growing hemp compulsory for farmers in some areas in order to supply fibre to manufacture military uniforms.

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The grittiness isn’t bad in a wholegrain loaf as it is similar to the other grains, for other finer cooking eg cakes a much finer grind is required or try getting the hulled seed to grind or the hulled seed flour. The hulled seeds are obviously much lower in fibre but you don’t get the gritty feel in the mouth. If you grind it yourself it is very oily so be prepared for that in using it unpressed in a recipe or squeeze/press the hemp cake/paste until you extract most of the oil, treat them as you would Sunflower seeds you might mill for their oil.

We find mixing the flour with other flours gives a better result texture wise than using a lot of or entirely hemp flour. Very low in carbs so great for Diabetics mixed with other low carb flours eg pea flour, high in oils & protein so good for keto diets.

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I always used it mixed with wheat flour, it was far too expensive to consider using straight!

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ATM the wheat flour is too carb rich on my VLCD/Keto mix diet.

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Have done a lot of research into hemp seed’s since they were legalised. I am no industry expert, but have tried and introduced hemp seed into my diet on a daily basis. Hemp is known to have all 20 proteins required in the human body, all present within it’s seed.

To gain all proteins otherwise foods are combined. The hemp industry since legalisation is still coming to agreement of what is the standard for nearly all of it’s products. Hemp has been in use as food source in many eastern block countries, but due to the notariety of hemp and it’s illict drug associations there is still a long way to go before a worldwide uniform standard is reached. Hemp was a huge product in the late 1800’s to early 1900’s, it was primarily used in the production of ropes , clothing and food. As more synthetic fibres became more widely used hemp started to fade away.

The resurgence has seen an industry that is almost crawling in growth. New technologies that have evolved from the illegitimate use’s and growing practices of the crop, now mean that there are many different manufacturing processes and a multitude of growing mediums. It is a by product of the medicinal cannabis industry, and so that the leftover seed can be used as a food it is treated to decrease it’s fertility for growth. It is currently undergoing strict testing with growth research and crop harvesting being trialled in a number of different processes.

As a food hemp is believed to supplement the body and cause the body to create homeostasis. More studies and human trials though need to be carried out by scientific/research companies into the effect of these on human nutrition and dietary requirements.

I consume a couple of tablespoons each morning combined with my breakfast grains. I have suffered in the past with Psorasis, and find that the oleic oil contained in the seed helps to reduce the inflammation of my skin. My overall health hasn’t really changed otherwise ( i have’nt asked the GP to run specific tests). I can say that it has not harmed me, and my skin has benefitted from it.

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Industrial Hemp is not the same as the Hemp that is used for THC extraction, they are both of the same family and species. I guess the seeds of the drug type Hemp could be eaten as a food but the THC levels would require a prescription I would think. The restriction of hemp was a knee jerk reaction to the one used for drug/medicinal use…someone or some people didn’t really understand the differences.

From the USA Congressional Research Service is this good article discussing the differences between the two types of hemp.
https://fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R44742.pdf

Also an easy read article from Britannica

As to creating homeostasis that seems to me to be a bit far fetched. Our bodies maintain homeostasis whether we have Hemp or not. If we didn’t maintain it we wouldn’t be alive.

As a food I use it to supplement my diet and as it is a good source of proteins and “good” oils it certainly has benefits. It helps my diet and adds both flavour and texture to breads etc. and I’m very glad it seems to be assisting your skin problem.

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@grahroll

Thank you for your informative additions to my comments. The basis of my comments, are to try and show people that “Cannabis” and HEMP does not mean that a consumer (in the broadest term) is a “drug addict or a pothead”. I was extremely surprised when I first heard mainstream media touting cannabis as a food. I though back to the late 70’s Early 80’s and the love and happiness - gaiety of “POT” and it’s illicit use. The research lead me to a number of articles that promote hemp and cannabis as a wonder drug. This leads me to wonder why then big pharma tried to synthesise it to make it cheaper (more profitable) and it caused deaths , but I digress. Cannabis is being used in building materials, clothing, medicinally and psychoactively ( controlled medical studies). It has recently been used to treat mental health issues and is actively being used to treat epilepsy in young children along with behavioural issues as well. My comments are that although a somewhat rediscovered food, there seems to be potential for a myriad of uses that cross over into health, construction, textile manufacturing and Food.

Cannabis may well be a great product, but with the amount of interest in its combined uses, it will need to be trialled and studied much more to be really known whether it is the wonder that people allover the world are purporting it to be.

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As far as I know “Cannabis” (the pschoactive production plant) Seeds are not sold as food items, they are still a controlled substance/product. I guess it depends on how you refer to the plants and their differences, as both are Sativa but there are genomic differences which is probably enough for them to be classified separately. What the very vast majority of hemp seed people eat is the industrial hemp type and it has very low THC levels as compared to the drug Cannabis type. Of course there would be some who do eat the “Cannabis” seeds but they would be either obtaining them illegally or via a prescription.

All the THC we (meaning in our household for Cancer treatment) use is by prescription and comes from the “Cannabis” plant industry not the Industrial Hemp industry though a grower may produce both types. Synthesis of the various 66 compounds found in the Cannabis derivatives would make it extremely costly and difficult for it to be man made. CBD (Cannabis or Hemp Oil) certainly comes from Industrial Hemp as well as the “Cannabis” plant but it is not psychoactive. Industrial Hemp is the easier source for CBD as the THC does not need extraction due to it’s already extremely low level in that plant’s products.

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