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Healthy Diet Versus Body Mass Index

A very interesting article regarding research into whether a healthy diet is more important than a person’s BMI.

When I was at our local shopping centre yesterday, I could not believe how many obese persons were there, mainly women, including those with young children, but I strongly suspect that their weight was mainly caused by junk food so this article won’t help them.

I was also wondering this week whether tomatoes and avocados were treated as fruit or veggis in the 5 serves of veggies & 2 serves of fruit diet per day guidelines, but after consulting Dr Google, they are treated as veggies despite botanically being fruits, which I had expected.

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I thought that BMI had been disproven as a valid or reliable indicator of good/bad health many years ago.

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Yippee, because every time I sneak into that magic weight range I don’t feel so great until I put a bit back on.

Umm, actually avocados are berries. The fibre and other nutrients have more in common with a banana than a lettuce leaf. It doesn’t matter though. 50gms is considered a full serve of avo which is barely 1/4 of a large one a day. Just as well given the price in the super market.

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/avocado-health-facts-didnt-dont-know_n_3786419

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By itself yes…as it doesn’t measure or relate to one’s overall health. But from memory when other health parameters are added (blood pressure, waist size, diet, habits, exercise regimes etc), it helps paint a picture.

Very unhealthy individuals (e.g. alcoholics, heavy smokers) may have a perfect BMI, but their overall picture is broken.

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I’m one of those, obese, (I don’t even want to say what my BMI is!)but you wont find any junk food in my trolley. I just can’t give up bread and potatoes. Not all obese people are junk food consumers.

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One of my Grandmothers was on the large side of cuddly. As children we never judged her for her shape or size. She was as thin as her seven sisters in her wedding pics. If we are seeking explanation, back in the 50’s and 60’s there was minimal junk food as we know it today.

There are numerous no blame explanations for why we are the shape we are. Medical conditions including mental health are big factors. Society and the work environment have altered, some say to our detriment. Our individual ability to cope is continually challenged. Addiction has many forms, with marketing of fast food just one of many that add the kiloJoules on the dietary cake.

The current KFC promotion of a serve of fat loaded fried chicken and potato starch just one in your face message as their product offers to solve your problem. ‘I don’t care’ by KFC is as evil as they come, IMO. Every box or bucket should come with graphic photos illustrating what over eating and poor food choices does to our bodies. Big Tobacco is not the only elephant in the room. Apologies to all those who believe fast food is essential for local sporting sponsorships and keeping younger Australians in low paid work.

Sometimes the only thing we need to change is our environment. Easier said than done when the standards for fast food advertising are outside the influence of the average consumer.

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I agree!! I sometimes choose to have some KFC, its not the fat that worries me, its the carbs. But even stripping off the skin (oh horrors I hear KFC addicts say) doesnt keep the carbs at bay, alas.

I see seriously obese kids around the neighbourhood and think to myself they are walking heart attacks. Its not just the influx of fast food companies, but also sedentary-creating situations, like computer games. Kids glued to screens eating fast food… really good… not.

It was computers that got me… and the games… at old Atari 2600 and the C64 started me going in the early 80s and really, I never got up again. Before that I was a keen tennis player and swimmer. All gone and me like the back end of a bus… but it has taken a few years to get this large (or wide, as a friends children used to say)

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I was not suggesting that, and that is what the article is all about.

I was merely commenting regarding our locals in the shopping centre including those who were scoffing donuts at Donut King.

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Yep, the curse of the Donut King.
Krispy Kreme are on our side. :rofl:

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I never get petrol at the local station because they sell Krispy Kreme and I love the old glazed donut. Sighhh.

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they said ‘mediterranean’ so maybe swap the donuts for cannoli :joy:

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LOL cannoli would be as bad, still carb laden. I had some dumplings the other night, they were really nice (I dont usually like dumplings) but they sent my BGL into the stratosphere and it took hours and many units of insulin to bring it down. Even donuts dont do that to me, nor do chips. But I try to avoid them, anyway.

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My personal totally layman opinion is that it’s an over-rated indicator.

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I absolutely loathe and detest olive oil, the taste and feel of it!
Rapeseed oil - don’t know it. Palm oil is in everything in Indonesia, but I assume it is not recommended in this. When I want oil, I use coconut. Might not be best for health, but taste is out of sight.

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Rapeseed Oil otherwise known as Canola Oil but it needs to be treated before used for human consumption. It was a marketing idea to rename it Canola Oil. Main component removed for domestic consumption is erucic acid & the oil is deodorised as well to make the smell less offensive or inoffensive :smile: Most varieties grown for human consumption have very low amounts of the acid in them compared to the industrial varieties (2% vs 60 - 80%).

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Body fat percentage has been shown to be an accurate indicator of the risk of increased mortality and predisposition to diseases in general – all when people’s BMIs or weight would indicate they are otherwise healthy. It is the internal adipose fat that can be hidden yet covering vital organs. Many seemingly lean people who boast they can eat whatever they like fall victim to this misconception.
I would like to see more food preparation and education on nutrition in children’s school curriculum. Maybe then the reliance on fast food and empty calories could be curtailed.

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