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Drone fast food and medicines delivery

shopping
drones
pharmacy
fast-food

#1

An Alphabet (formerly Google) company has apparently been testing home deliveries of pizza and pharmaceuticals in a small area of South Canberra.

This is allegedly going to be expanded in the near future, both through Canberra and to other cities.

My wife mentioned today that our house has been visited a couple of times by drones that she has heard but not seen. Certainly we are worried about our privacy, and the likelihood of drones with cameras flying overhead does not fill me with joy.

I would be interested to hear of any experiences others have had with these deliveries, what has gone right/wrong, and how they affect neighbours of the receiving household.


#2

No drone is safe flying over my house.

Doubly so if its carrying (non-vegan) pizza …


#3

Seems like a great idea on the surface, but the use of drones like this is an accident waiting to happen. At this stage it is not safe to have them flying over people.

If one of these causes an accident or injury :flight_arrival: , given they are not registered, how do you find who’s flying it, or where they are, or who the owner is? Who’s responsible?

Too many uncontrollable variables and too dangerous.


#4

Agree, and when the first, second etc accidents happen, I suspect the enthusiasm for the 'technology’may dry up.

It seems a bit of a gimic…marketing exercise.


#5

I believe that was said about numerous technological innovations over time, propbably starting with fire or the wheel. ‘The fad will pass, don’t worry about it’…

Those of us who have managed to attain older age are generally more suspicious and less accepting of changes, and especially changes that rattle our realities while pushing beyond our comfort zones.

Law and enforcement have most always been reactive. With technologically underpinned ‘new things’ those responsible for governance (oversight? red tape? regulation?) generally do not understand any of it and struggle mightily, while dismissing educated advice that does not suit their own predilections, leading to roo in the headlights syndrome waiting to see how much road kill or collateral damage surfaces prior to responding.


#6

I do wonder about the vision the drone cameras will collect or observe and whether in due course it will be saved. Hence it will be there forever for both good and evil.

Would the data streams be reliably encrypted and hack proof?

Would P Dutton outsource homeland security to such a service? (apologies to George Orwell)?

Global enterprises such as Alphabet and Amazon have the resources to have strategically thought through all the issues arising form their plans to use drones. Australia has an above average love affair with technology and limited protection of individual freedoms and privacy.

In a practical sense providing the drones are:

  • silent,
  • do not capture images,
  • don’t crash and cause loss,
  • don’t grow in size to make 50kg party deliveries,
  • and can handle at least a slab or carton of bubbles

They will have a welcome future around here. For the protagonists to succeed it will be critical they move faster than legislation, expand the market they are inventing and manage any counter.

We can only hope that the local peregrine falcons don’t take a liking to pizza or beer. They are definitely not vegan so some deliveries may still get through.

p.s. Note the reference to the delivery of medicines. Is this the most “insert word of your choosing” example of marketing spin feeding on our guilt that people may die if we don’t accept this new life saving drone technology?


#7

George Orwell’s homeland is apparently the most surveilled on Earth - surpassing even China in cameras per person.

Because otherwise the commun… terrorists will get us all!

In that vein, I heard something that was said by a high-level US military officer many decades ago - “If communism didn’t exist, we would have to create it”. Prescient indeed.