Coles price increases - much higher than inflation?

No. Supply and demand is fundamental to both micro and macro economics. It is also fundamental to how most businesses operate.

They don’t ‘dismiss’, they explain the concept with modelling and centuries of data to show the models are sound.

YOU may choose to dismiss what the economists say. But be very sure that they couldn’t care less about your opinion.

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Making your own pancakes without commercial mix is very easy and if you have pancakes often you will save money buying the separate ingredients that you don’t already have.

If you lack a mixer use a clean plastic milk bottle and shake them up. This is also easy and has the advantage of being easy to poor into the pan and you can make your mix the night before and have a quick breakfast the next day. Also the texture will improve somewhat as the flour has time to hydrate.

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Yes have noticed massive price hikes on lots, if not most, items we buy. A suggestion on how best to deal with it would be useful. Especially as we have health issues that severely restrict our options!

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I have noticed a huge increase in Coles Supermarkets, even their own brands. I can’t for the life of me imagine why Kitty Litter Crystals have gone up by 25%, and that isn’t even a year. They should have to justify their increases, but they won’t. I wonder how families are balancing their budgets with such steep increases in everyday products.

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I am not defending Coles price increases.
Some explanation may be the increased fuel costs for deliveries, the devastating floods in many of the agricultural areas of eastern Australian, farmers trying to rebuild flocks and herds, the continuing supply chain shortages, lagging Covid pandemic impacts like labour shortages, seasonal demand eg cherries, mangoes, seafood and similar…

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Welcome to the forum.

You are right, probably all the reasons you give and more are putting up supermarket prices. Having had fair price stability for some time the contrast is now leading people to wish for price control. They may not use that phrase but it amounts to that.

The assumption is that Colesworths is having a lend of us by jacking up prices well beyond explicable reasons. Every anomaly is given as justification for saying so. Overall this may or may not be true, we will never find out though just by saying the price of XYZ went up so it must be so. If we don’t know why the price of XYZ was lower before and we don’t know why it is higher now then we don’t know why the price has risen, it doesn’t prevent speculation though. Aorta doosumfin!

It’s a suggestion, a question to be answered, not an assumption. All I was saying is that my example, which was random as far as it could be, had gone up by about three times inflation, so I was asking if better samples could confirm this or otherwise, and if so, what might explain such a large increase.

However, recent news included an observation that non-discretionary inflation is actually much higher than the overall rate. My sample of groceries would would count as non-discretionary, therefore this is the inflation that would apply to it. The news item quoted annual non-discretionary inflation NDI as being a bit over 18%, about the same as my sample. While this confirms my original observation, it does not explain it, since the measured NDI could just be high because retailers could be using inflation as a cover for unjustified increases.

Either way, there has been significant press coverage in the last fortnight on the subject of grocery price increases, so some attention is being directed to the matter.

I was, speaking to the local iga and asked what happens to the perishable food fresh fruit etc he said gets throw out i ask about the major shops he said they try to repack using fresh ontop ok the packaging. He told me that he refuse to resell trying to hide older underneath new. He mentioned that the previous owners were lousy. Must be so much waste.

It’s common for supermarkets and some other stores to have mark down specials as products approach expiry dates.

We’ve been able to travel a bit over the past 18 months including regional NSW, Vic and some of QLD. From small ‘local’ IGA stores, independent F&V in scale up to the big 3. It’s many years since we came across a fresh food item prepackaged where we might think the unthinkable. New used to top up old to outwit a customer.

The larger supermarket chains all provide consumers with assurances, enabling returning of fresh product for refunds or exchange if it is not up to standard.

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